Adonis

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Lori S.
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-10-27
Adonis

These bright spring ephemerals have been in bloom for a while now, and these two, at least, are grown easily in our dry, cold conditions.
1, 2) Adonis amurensis 'Fukujukai'
3, 4) Adonis vernalis

Hoy
Hoy's picture
Title: Member
Joined: 2009-12-15

Marvellous!
Here they become lax and soon eaten by slugs!

Trond
Rogaland, Norway - with cool, often rainy summers  (29C max) and mild, often rainy winters (180 cm/year)!

Boland
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Title: Member
Joined: 2009-09-25

Wish I could get the d*** seeds to germinate!  I cannot find a source for plants.  It is one of my favorites!

Todd Boland
St. John's, Newfoundland, Canada
Zone 5b
1800 mm precipitation per year

Lori S.
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-10-27

I read somewhere that perennial adonis have rather low fertility from seed... for some reason that now escapes me.  I'll try to see if I can find the reference.

Lori
Calgary, Alberta, Canada - Zone 3
-30 C to +30 C (rarely!); elevation ~1130m; annual precipitation ~40 cm

Lori S.
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-10-27

Todd, see the Fraser's Thimble Farms catalogue.
Hmm, I'm debating if I want to spring $60 for an orange-flowered A. amurensis cultivar... the answer is "ARE YOU KIDDING??  YES!!!", of course!  They also have the species... a comparative steal at only $12.95.  (Something I never think to do is to divide or grow a few more of my own plants from seed... some insurance against loss in the garden would be nice...)
http://www.thimblefarms.com/

I remembered... it is Deno's Seed Germination Theory and Practice that talks about perennial adonis seed viability.   He reported that he'd planted over 30 samples of various species and had total failure due to a high proportion of normal-sized and completely normal-looking seed having empty shells.  It is, apparently, genetic defects that lead to defective pollen and pistils, and empty shells.  

Lori
Calgary, Alberta, Canada - Zone 3
-30 C to +30 C (rarely!); elevation ~1130m; annual precipitation ~40 cm

Kelaidis
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Title: Member
Joined: 2010-02-03

This is the annual Adonis annua, a bright red gem that thrives in a hot scree. I wouldn't be without it. Seed must be fresh, however, to grow the next year...

For every minion of the peaks there are a dozen steppe children growing in the dry Continental heart of all hemispheres still unknown to horticulture.

Boland
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Title: Member
Joined: 2009-09-25

I saw A. annua all over Spain..lovely sight!

Todd Boland
St. John's, Newfoundland, Canada
Zone 5b
1800 mm precipitation per year

Peter George
Title: Member
Joined: 2009-09-03

The particular clone of A. amurensis that is being grown is virtually sterile. It's been around a long time, and only a tiny percentage of the seeds it produces are viable. There was an article in an older NARGS journal explaining the genetic underpinnings of it's lack of viabililty, and if I locate the issue, I'll post it here.
I grow two different clones, one I obtained from Harvey Wrightman, and one from Don Dembowski, and apparently neither are 'Fukujukai,' as both produced seed that eventually germinated.
I also grow A. vernalis, and it is self fertile, almost to a fault. The seed always germinates if I leave it where it falls, but it never germinates when I move it or put it in a pot. It's a beautiful plant, growing here in both full sun and in an almost woodland area with only early morning and late afternoon sun. It bloomed generously in both, although the shaded plant bloomed less intensely but for a longer period.

Peter George, Petersham, MA (north central MA, close to the NH/VT borders), zones 5b and 6 around the property.

Kelaidis
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Title: Member
Joined: 2010-02-03

Aha! Someone who grows Adonis vernalis well...what can I swap you for some fresh seed? I've been anxious to grow this one...I grow Adonis amurensis well, and ought to do right by vernalis, but not had luck with plants thus far. Maybe fresh seed sown direct on the ground would work. I understand you like Western steppe plants?

For every minion of the peaks there are a dozen steppe children growing in the dry Continental heart of all hemispheres still unknown to horticulture.

Peter George
Title: Member
Joined: 2009-09-03

I should have about 20 'extra' seeds in a couple of weeks, and would be happy to send them to you. I'd welcome some fresh Pulsatilla patens seeds in exchange. I'll get them to you as soon as they are ready! And here is a photo of my most mature plant very early this spring.

Peter George, Petersham, MA (north central MA, close to the NH/VT borders), zones 5b and 6 around the property.

Kelaidis
Kelaidis's picture
Title: Member
Joined: 2010-02-03

I almost always collect a bucket of patens seed, so it's a deal! I don't GROW patens very well, but it is extremely abundant from the piedmont mesas at 5600 to over 11,000' in some places. I shall seek a quantity out for you in the next month!

For every minion of the peaks there are a dozen steppe children growing in the dry Continental heart of all hemispheres still unknown to horticulture.

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