Parry's easter daisy

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Mark McD
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-12-14

Skulski wrote:

Thanks, Panayoti - I'll keep my eyes peeled for it.

Despite the early date, here are flower buds on Townsendia leptotes:

Lots of promise in those buds!  I think it is useful to provide photos of such as these, to document what a plant looks like at various times of the year.  So I provide a view of my plant of Townsendia rothrockii today also showing promising buds (the foliage a bit winter-beaten), and a view from 2009 post-flowering showing the seed heads.

Mark McDonough
Massachusetts, USA, near the New Hampshire border USDA Zone 5
antennaria at aol.com
 

Lori S.
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-10-27

I agree completely!  When I am growing something unfamiliar, I am usually testing hardiness, and the first thing I wonder in spring is whether it is evergreen or herbaceous... or alternatively, dead, LOL!

Lori
Calgary, Alberta, Canada - Zone 3
-30 C to +30 C (rarely!); elevation ~1130m; annual precipitation ~40 cm

Mark McD
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-12-14

Skulski wrote:

I agree completely!  When I am growing something unfamiliar, I am usually testing hardiness, and the first thing I wonder in spring is whether it is evergreen or herbaceous... or alternatively, dead, LOL!

Exactly.  So, the little Townsendias are evergreen (at least the two species we're growing), and the buds are actually visible in the fall and winter, tucked deep into the rosettes.  I've been watching them over the past several weeks, and suddenly they are swelling and the involucre color is deepening.

Mark McDonough
Massachusetts, USA, near the New Hampshire border USDA Zone 5
antennaria at aol.com
 

cohan
cohan's picture
Title: Guest
Joined: 2011-02-03

I have a couple of parryi, in first time bud ( they are a couple of years old, but only planted in the ground a year ago) one is nearly ready to open.. wonder if they will survive the forecast -9C thursday morning ? wonder if covering would be of any use?

west central alberta, canada; just under 1000m; record temps:min -45C/-49F;max 34C/93F; http://picasaweb.google.ca/cactuscactus  http://urbanehillbillycanada.blogspot.com/

cohan
cohan's picture
Title: Guest
Joined: 2011-02-03

Here is one of the plants I mentioned above, it is in a bed in front of the house, so it's warmer and sunnier than the bed where several others are in bud, but unlikely to open unless we get another warm spell.. I did put a tarp over part of this bed during our two coldest nights (somewhere between -5 an d-9C) not sure if it was necessary or not..
Not quite fully open, but enough to be satisfying!

west central alberta, canada; just under 1000m; record temps:min -45C/-49F;max 34C/93F; http://picasaweb.google.ca/cactuscactus  http://urbanehillbillycanada.blogspot.com/

Hoy
Hoy's picture
Title: Member
Joined: 2009-12-15

Very adoreable! Have to consider trying it I think!

Trond
Rogaland, Norway - with cool, often rainy summers  (29C max) and mild, often rainy winters (180 cm/year)!

cohan
cohan's picture
Title: Guest
Joined: 2011-02-03

From the earlier posts, I guess they aren't usually as stemless as these- this is probably just due to cold, but Lori could say for sure, the seed came from her a couple of years ago...
I'll let you know when I get seed, though I doubt this one will be making any-- currently partly covered in snow, though it should warm up again in the next couple of days..

west central alberta, canada; just under 1000m; record temps:min -45C/-49F;max 34C/93F; http://picasaweb.google.ca/cactuscactus  http://urbanehillbillycanada.blogspot.com/

Hoppel
Hoppel's picture
Title: Member
Joined: 2009-12-29

I'd like to add some more information about T.parryi cultivation in Central Europe. In my garden it is growing well in crevice garden, in sand bed and in regular amphibolite rock garden (90% of grit), also in a trough. My plants come from different sources and I can see some variablity in shape of flower, petals and height. I've never seen any descriprions of varieties or plants coming from different localities - has anyone seen that? Photos of different forms attached.

Michal Hoppel

Poznan

POLAND

michal@alpines.pl

www.alpines.pl

cohan
cohan's picture
Title: Guest
Joined: 2011-02-03

All looking good, Michael, mine are all growing in a mix of our natural clayey soil with gravel (more gravel top few inches, more soil below) in somewhat sloped raised rock beds..

west central alberta, canada; just under 1000m; record temps:min -45C/-49F;max 34C/93F; http://picasaweb.google.ca/cactuscactus  http://urbanehillbillycanada.blogspot.com/

Lori S.
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-10-27

Kelaidis wrote:

I'm basing my comments on the gestalt of the plant...it just LOOKS like a miniaturized parryi...

I'm forming the iimpression that some plants that occur in both places are typically a lot smaller up here than are their counterparts further south, e.g. Colorado.  

Here are typical examples of Townsendia parryi from this area - the floral discs are ridiculously large in relation to the tiny rosettes and short stems!   (Nature has maximized the cuteness quotient... )

       

 

  

Note small size compared to surrounding tiny, single Androsace chamaejasme rosettes:

 

This one is less compact yet still very short:

 

 

Lori
Calgary, Alberta, Canada - Zone 3
-30 C to +30 C (rarely!); elevation ~1130m; annual precipitation ~40 cm

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