Miscellaneous Woodlanders

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Mark McD
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-12-14

Cohan, let us know what your seedlings end up being smiley

Rick, never thought of the possibility limbing a tree up would be stressful on the tree.  The bulk of the limb material is dead, and I imagined "lightening the load" on the tree would actually be beneficial.  The first tree in this row of trees, I did 2 years ago, to have some shade to plant out Epimedium seedlings; all went well. So this year I finished the row of trees (6 in all), must have been 50 heaping wheelbarrow loads of chopped up limbs. One of the six is a Blue Spruce, and it is not as aggressive on roots, nice planting pockets beneath, the others are firs (I remember the label on one of them when they were small, as white fir), and digging planting pockets around them is tough, definitely some root cutting.  When we first moved in 26 years ago, the evergreen trees in this long row were small, I used a number of them as Christmas trees until they go too big.

I've taken some photos of the project, and hope to post here on NARGS, as a way to show recuperating valuable space, and to gain some shade gardening opportunities in a yard that is essentially sun, sun, sun, or so it was when we first moved in.

 

Mark McDonough
Massachusetts, USA, near the New Hampshire border USDA Zone 5
antennaria at aol.com
 

RickR
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-09-21

A high mountain fir like Abies concolor (White fir) will have deeper root systems than others, and this would also include a Colorado spruce, too.  They would be less affected by limbing up than any lowland species in general.  As far as lightening the load, don't know about that, but I know they both are breathing a sigh of fresh air relief.  Being mountain species they are adapted to constant winds and need good air circulation for long term health.  The Colorado spruce, especially, suffers in the high humidity and stagnant air that the eastern half of the US experiences.This is why lower branches of trees 30ft and taller have lower branches that die, even though they receive ample sun; they are susceptible to a cytospera canker in our climates due to the excess moisture that lingers in the lower parts of the tree the longest.

Rick Rodich    zone 4a.    Annual precipitation ~24 inches
near Minneapolis, Minnesota, USA

RickR
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-09-21

I've grow Pachysandra procumbens in different locations in the yard for seven years now.  They don't seem to multiply this far north, or at least in my yard, but they are remarkably tenacious in warm and very dry shade.  They are here as a curiosity, 'cause they sure aren't a groundcover for me!  My pines are getting bigger now, and perhaps they will do better with the slightly more acidic conditions under them.  (Note to self: transplant Pachysandra).

 

  The 2-2.5 inch flower stalks are always fun, especially since they open so early, and even though plants don't look that great, they reliably bloom every year.

20 April 2014

                

 

30 April 2014

          

Rick Rodich    zone 4a.    Annual precipitation ~24 inches
near Minneapolis, Minnesota, USA

Hoy
Hoy's picture
Title: Member
Joined: 2009-12-15

Rick, I´ve grown P. terminalis but procumbens looks more exotic!

Trond
Rogaland, Norway - with cool, often rainy summers  (29C max) and mild, often rainy winters (180 cm/year)!

Lori S.
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-10-27

Yes, it is lovely!  P. terminalis barely survives here (the neighbour grows it), not sure it's ever managed to flower.  I assume P. procumbens is less hardy?

Lori
Calgary, Alberta, Canada - Zone 3
-30 C to +30 C (rarely!); elevation ~1130m; annual precipitation ~40 cm

Hoy
Hoy's picture
Title: Member
Joined: 2009-12-15

A few plants from my woodland today:

Anemone prattii with huge flowers. This one has 4 petals, but 5 is common.

 

 

Ariaema elephas coming strong              Convallaria majalis var rosea, the fragrance is beautiful but the colour is not. Melittis melissophyllum

   

 

Primula alpicola? and                                Primula heucherifolia?, both from seeds last year.

 

Trond
Rogaland, Norway - with cool, often rainy summers  (29C max) and mild, often rainy winters (180 cm/year)!

deesen
deesen's picture
Title: Guest
Joined: 2011-01-31

Lovely woodland pictures Trond.

David Nicholson
in Devon, UK  Zone 9b

Hoy
Hoy's picture
Title: Member
Joined: 2009-12-15

Thanks, David, one day I'll show you the weeds!

Trond
Rogaland, Norway - with cool, often rainy summers  (29C max) and mild, often rainy winters (180 cm/year)!

Hoy
Hoy's picture
Title: Member
Joined: 2009-12-15

A few more from the woodland as it isn't much flowering in my new rock garden. The sunny and dry weather we have now is not easy for the new plants in the sandy soil there! I've already lost some although I water as often as I can.

The plants growing in the shade of the trees and shrubs do better although it is starting to be very dry there too!

 

Allium triquetrum    Anemone narcissiflora(?) pink form from seed several years ago - first flowers. Polygonatum prattii(?)

   

 

Arisaema candidissumum    Arisaema elephas(?) has made a nice group     An unknown Arisaema

     

 

Meconopsis sp from Chadwell seeds, a prickly biennial species.   And finally the unknown Roscoe species.

   

Trond
Rogaland, Norway - with cool, often rainy summers  (29C max) and mild, often rainy winters (180 cm/year)!

Longma
Longma's picture
Title: Guest
Joined: 2012-11-19

I would suggest that it's Roscoea humeana Trond, smiley

53.69° N, Dedicated to West Coast Fritillaria, plus three other members of the subgenus Liliorhiza. I grow other Genera, as time permits !

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