Favorite wood lily

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Kelaidis
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Joined: 2010-02-03
Favorite wood lily

I realize Lilium philadelphicum grows across much of the USA, yet one rarely sees it in gardens. Thanks to Laporte Avenue Nursery in Fort Collins, our local Rocky Mountain form is getting pretty wide distribution: here is a clump I've grown for a number of years beneath the big Scots pines in the eastern corner of my garden. There is something about the graceful bearing of the plant (not to mention its small size--only about a foot tall) that makes it a great addition to the woodland rock garden. The literature says it needs acid soil: that must be the eastern subspecies L. philadelphicum v. philadelphicum. Our miniature L. p. var. andinum can grow in very limy substrates. I've seen a large colony out on the Great Plains of Montana growing in a limy swale (not far from Choteau were the Grizzlies and Eritrichium howardii dance beneath the stars)...

Lori S.
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-10-27

Lovely!  The form that occurs throughout the Canadian prairie provinces definitely does not need acid soil either.  For the centennial of the province of Saskatchewan (my home province) in 2005, thousands of cultivated L. philadephicum seedlings were given out, so I hope at least some of them survived and are being appreciated.
This area is said to have var. andinum as well.  How tall are the "miniature" plants you mention?

Another from the garden:

Lori
Calgary, Alberta, Canada - Zone 3
-30 C to +30 C (rarely!); elevation ~1130m; annual precipitation ~40 cm

Kelaidis
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Title: Member
Joined: 2010-02-03

In open areas, Lilium philadelphicum var. andinum is usually only about a foot tall. In very rich soil, or growing in junipers or out of shrubs (as it often does in nature--to avoid herbivory) you can find them up to 18" or even 20" tall. But they are never that big for me in my rock garden where they are more exposed.

For every minion of the peaks there are a dozen steppe children growing in the dry Continental heart of all hemispheres still unknown to horticulture.

Gene Mirro
Title: Member
Joined: 2010-02-25

I'm planning to travel to Colorado this summer.  Can anyone recommend best times and places to see magnificent mountain scenery and wildflowers, especially Lilium philadelphicum?  I'm accustomed to driving on unpaved roads, and have GPS, but I don't have a Jeep or four-wheel-drive.  I know it's hard to find ugly scenery in Colorado, but where would you go if you only had a few days?  I can't go to the annual meeting, since it conflicts with another species lily event in California.

I've grown dozens of lily species, but I find L. phila.  very slow and difficult.  In the open ground, the seedlings are prone to 100% failure over the winter (in the Pacific NW).  I find that seedlings grown in a gallon pot in a cool greenhouse grow well and have good survival.

SW Washington state, 600 ft. altitude

Kelaidis
Kelaidis's picture
Title: Member
Joined: 2010-02-03

Sorry you will miss Salida! Wood lilies are usually blooming in Colorado from the last week of June to the fourth of July or so: they are locally common and very fun to find. I can direct you to some good spots. Peak season for alpines is usually a week either side of the fourth of July. Subalpines are usually midJuly to August, montane is usually June and July..you get the picture.

There has been a tremendous amount of snow in Southwestern Colorado, so the season there will probably be delayed.

Laporte Avenue Nursery in Fort Collins has great luck growing Lilium philadelphiicum: They mass produce it for High Country Gardens. They often come to bloom in a year or so...

Do come visit Denver Botanic Gardens: we have some good lilies too!

For every minion of the peaks there are a dozen steppe children growing in the dry Continental heart of all hemispheres still unknown to horticulture.

IMYoung
Title: Member
Joined: 2010-01-31

Quote:

I've seen a large colony out on the Great Plains of Montana growing in a limy swale (

Help, please.... "swale" is not a word with which I am familiar, (outside of its inclusion in the name Swaledale, a place and breed of sheep in the UK!)....it sounds damp??
Cheers,
Maggi

Ian  and/or Margaret Young ( -here it is usually Margaret)

Aberdeen , North East Scotland, UK
Zone 8a

www.srgc.net

Hoy
Hoy's picture
Title: Member
Joined: 2009-12-15

In Norwegian "sval" means cool (=not warm) and shady. A "svalgang" is a roof buildt outside the house along the wall where you can walk or sit in shade.

Trond
Rogaland, Norway - with cool, often rainy summers  (29C max) and mild, often rainy winters (180 cm/year)!

Lori S.
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-10-27

"Swale" = a low-lying or depressed and often wet stretch of land (Webster's New Collegiate Dictionary).

Lori
Calgary, Alberta, Canada - Zone 3
-30 C to +30 C (rarely!); elevation ~1130m; annual precipitation ~40 cm

Kelaidis
Kelaidis's picture
Title: Member
Joined: 2010-02-03

Wow! Can't believe we use swale and they don't in Scotland. Apparently there is now low ground in Scotland that is seasonally flooded (which is what swale means hereabouts): I had no idea it was so bone dry there!

If the Youngs are listening (and are they ever not?) I have tried to log onto SRGC forum repeatedly, and it tells my computer that your site is under construction or suchlike. A Pretty good defence against us hopeless Americans I suppose...

For every minion of the peaks there are a dozen steppe children growing in the dry Continental heart of all hemispheres still unknown to horticulture.

IMYoung
Title: Member
Joined: 2010-01-31

Thanks, PK... I had it right with  damp, then! May just be my ignorance but perhaps it is more used in England.... as you surmise, Scotland is a wondrously dry sunny country with no need for such nomenclature..... NOT!!  ::) ;D ;D ;)

I think your difficulties with logging into the SRGC Site must arise from a browser problem... the site is fully operational to which the hundreds of posts per day would attest.....check your computer settings re browsing... I think that should sort out your problems  :D

Ian  and/or Margaret Young ( -here it is usually Margaret)

Aberdeen , North East Scotland, UK
Zone 8a

www.srgc.net

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