Re: Image of the day - 2013

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cohan
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Title: Guest
Joined: 2011-02-03

Weiser wrote:

Cohan
Mark Egger is one of the leading authorities on many of the genera included in Orobanchaceae. He maintains an extensive collection of photos on his Flickr sight. You can find it at:
http://www.flickr.com/photos/34090482@N03

The sets concerning Castilleja angustifolia  and Castilleja chromosa  are here:
http://www.flickr.com/photos/mark_egger_castilleja/sets/72157618126246340/
http://www.flickr.com/photos/mark_egger_castilleja/sets/72157622958231623/
http://www.flickr.com/photos/mark_egger_castilleja/sets/72157623099443080/
http://www.flickr.com/photos/mark_egger_castilleja/sets/72157623092414012/
http://www.flickr.com/photos/mark_egger_castilleja/sets/72157622936648115/
http://www.flickr.com/photos/mark_egger_castilleja/sets/72157622992818505/

I hope this clears up some of the confusion. The reason I stated that Castilleja angustifolia  and Castilleja chromosa were synonymous was from my experiences with the Jepson Manual used in California. I guess I was assuming that the same held true across the west. I was wrong.  :rolleyes:
It's always nice to know were to find an expert.  I hope you enjoy his Flickr sight It's a great resource.

I've spoken to Mark Egger just a little re: my local Castillejas- some of which he felt seem to be some sort of hybrid swarm, though he hadn't had time/ close enough look to make any solid guesses as to what is involved besides C miniata. It is good to hear from someone knowledgeable- since only miniata is clearly in my area on the maps, but the plants seemed extremely varied for that ...
I hope to try some other species in my garden, in particular outside the range of colours of the local plants, which is what drew me to the pink/plum shades mentioned re:angustifolia- the plants here go from cream through scarlet, but none of the bluer pinks/reds etc..

Brian- good tips on the Kelseya, thanks..

west central alberta, canada; just under 1000m; record temps:min -45C/-49F;max 34C/93F; http://picasaweb.google.ca/cactuscactus  http://urbanehillbillycanada.blogspot.com/

Brian_W
Title: Guest
Joined: 2012-04-28

Regarding the cultivation of Mentzelia:  Perhaps a person could build their house along the railroad tracks.  We have some monsters that grow along the tracks around here.

Gene's description of them as being  "a big straggly thing" is accurate:

http://i1072.photobucket.com/albums/w362/townsendia/013_zps2f448cc2-1_zp...
But the flowers are :o

http://i1072.photobucket.com/albums/w362/townsendia/021_zpsfd0f0d06-1_zp...

Hoy
Hoy's picture
Title: Member
Joined: 2009-12-15

Brian_W wrote:

Regarding the cultivation of Mentzelia:  Perhaps a person could build their house along the railroad tracks.  We have some monsters that grow along the tracks around here.

Gene's description of them as being  "a big straggly thing" is accurate:
But the flowers are :o

"big straggly thing" is quite something for me!

Trond
Rogaland, Norway - with cool, often rainy summers  (29C max) and mild, often rainy winters (180 cm/year)!

RickR
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-09-21

Brian, the photos you are showing are really out of this world in quality and subject matter.  We can't thank you enough!

Gene wrote:

Is it a coincidence that nearly all of my favorite plants are nearly impossible to grow?

Gene, you sure don't seem to have any problem growing those wonderful Lilium spp.  And great articles in the International Rock Gardener, too!

Rick Rodich    zone 4a.    Annual precipitation ~24 inches
near Minneapolis, Minnesota, USA

Brian_W
Title: Guest
Joined: 2012-04-28
Mark McD
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-12-14

Brian, your photos are simply outstanding! :o :o

The portrait of Sedum lanceolatum, with red-lined edges to the buds, shows what a remarkable beauty it is, too bad we often give short shrift to sedums.

The natural rock garden with Lupinus sericeus is wonderful; is that Trifolium parryi in the background?  This is the sort of rock garden scenario I'd like to emulate, where comfortable rounded mixed size boulders, rocks, and pebbles provide the backdrop for choice plants.

Mark McDonough
Massachusetts, USA, near the New Hampshire border USDA Zone 5
antennaria at aol.com
 

Brian_W
Title: Guest
Joined: 2012-04-28

Greetings,

The Sedum is drought stressed and growing in full sun, and that really brings out the reddish color.  When I first became interested in rock gardening, I would often over look the more common plants in search of something more "choice".  But now I take a closer look at everything.  There are a lot of plants out there that can contribute to the overall scheme.

Yes, that is Trifolium parryi.  Trifolium nanum grows in the same site along with an excellent form of Eriogonum flavum that forms large dense cushions with the flowers nestled in the foliage. http://eriogonum.org/gallery2/main.php?g2_itemId=628

Tim Ingram
Title: Member
Joined: 2011-04-27

Very interesting to see Pulsatilla patens as I planted this out on a sand bed last autumn. Hope it will look as good as this when it flowers! There has been a very stimulating and fascinating debate on the SRGC Forum on Pulsatilla, showing the exquisite yellow form of patens, flavescens. Quite a lot of debate about names. I noticed in the Alplains seedlist that P. occidentalis is listed under Anemone. Is that generally accepted? It seems much more like a Pulsatilla to me.(There are some beautiful photos on the SRGC Forum as well).

Dr. Timothy John Ingram
Faversham, Kent, UK
I garden in a relatively hot and dry region (for the UK!), with an annual rainfall of around 25", winter lows of -10°C and summer highs of 30°C.
 

cohan
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Title: Guest
Joined: 2011-02-03

Brian- Sedum lanceolatum is a long time favourite of mine- being into succulents from my earliest indoor/outdoor gardening days, and this is one of few succulents actually native to Alberta! Besides that, it has wonderful foliage form, quite distinct among Sedums. I saw it a few times in my teen years, but haven't seen it since I've been back home, and have yet to get it for my garden, but it is a top wish.. I didn't realise the buds were so showy..

Tim, I think someone in North America has decided the native Pulsatillas should be back in Anemone- I think I've seen patens stuck back there as well. I think Alplains had occidentalis listed as a Pulsatilla previously...

west central alberta, canada; just under 1000m; record temps:min -45C/-49F;max 34C/93F; http://picasaweb.google.ca/cactuscactus  http://urbanehillbillycanada.blogspot.com/

Hoy
Hoy's picture
Title: Member
Joined: 2009-12-15

Brian, you are an artist!

Trond
Rogaland, Norway - with cool, often rainy summers  (29C max) and mild, often rainy winters (180 cm/year)!

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