Some Edraianthus

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Lori S.
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-10-27
Some Edraianthus

I was told that Edraianthus do well here, and in my (albeit) brief experience with them, that seems to be true.

Edraianthus serbicus is a very showy one. Here's a plant in its second year from seed. Seeds were collected by M. Pavelka in the Konavska Hills, Bulgaria at 1400m elevation. Germination was straightforward and easy, with no seed treatment (e.g. stratification, scarification, GA-3) required; the seeds germinated at room temperature after about 10 days.

According to Graham Nicholls' Dwarf Campanulas (an excellent resource!), E. serbicus is endemic to a relatively restricted area of calcareous outcrops in western Bulgaria and eastern Serbia. Given its natural habitat on limestone substrates, my tufa bed (pictured) should be a fitting environment for it.

Its a very low-growing plant; even the flower stems in bloom stand no more than an inch or so above the ground surface. Here in this northern climate, the bloom occurs in late June and through July - a very nice addition to the rock garden, and probably a good choice for the beginner to try!

Lori S.
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-10-27

Here's Edraianthus dalmaticus, started from NARGS seedex seed in '09, and growing in a trough and in a non-calcareous crevice bed.  This species, according again to Graham Nicholls, grows in screes in Montenegro and Serbia. This one was also easy from seed, with no seed treatment required.  

This species has very different form than E. serbicus, being much more upright and reaching to about 5 inches tall in bloom in my conditions.  The bloom time is about the same.

Lori
Calgary, Alberta, Canada - Zone 3
-30 C to +30 C (rarely!); elevation ~1130m; annual precipitation ~40 cm

Hoy
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Title: Member
Joined: 2009-12-15

Lori, seems you are right regarding thriving Edraianthus at your place. I have tried some but they are always shortlived here. Maybe I should try at the mountain cabin ;)

Trond
Rogaland, Norway - with cool, often rainy summers  (29C max) and mild, often rainy winters (180 cm/year)!

Weiser
Title: Member
Joined: 2009-12-04

Cool plants.  8) You are doing something right they look very happy. :)

I like the mat forming species I have a few seedlings out in the garden and will be ordering seed of a couple of others from the exchange this year.

From the High Desert Steppe
of the Great Basin and the Eastern
Escarpment of the Sierra Nevada Range
Located in Reno/Sparks,NV  zone 6-7
http://www.flickr.com/photos/sierrarainshadow/
John P Weiser

Lori S.
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-10-27

Here's another one that is rather similar to E. dalmaticus in general character and size, though the flower colour is a bit more vivid, at least on this individual... E. graminifolius, another denizen of limestone outcrops, from the Mediterranean to Eastern Europe (according again to Mr. Nicholls' excellent reference book):                    

 

It seems that this species has been in quite a state of flux between various genera - Edraianthus, Wahlenbergia, Campanula, Pilorea, Campanopsis... !
http://www.theplantlist.org/tpl/record/kew-369187

Lori
Calgary, Alberta, Canada - Zone 3
-30 C to +30 C (rarely!); elevation ~1130m; annual precipitation ~40 cm

Hoy
Hoy's picture
Title: Member
Joined: 2009-12-15

Lori wrote:

Here's another one that is rather similar to E. dalmaticus in general character and size, though the flower colour is a bit more vivid, at least on this individual... E. graminifolius, another denizen of limestone outcrops, from the Mediterranean to Eastern Europe (according again to Mr. Nicholls' excellent reference book):                    

It seems that this species has been in quite a state of flux between various genera - Edraianthus, Wahlenbergia, Campanula, Pilorea, Campanopsis... !
http://www.theplantlist.org/tpl/record/kew-369187

I like this one! It reminds me of a refined version of Campanula cervicea cervicaria not unkommon here.

From this site: http://verdalsbilder.no/cpg1410/displayimageNA.php?pos=-4146

Trond
Rogaland, Norway - with cool, often rainy summers  (29C max) and mild, often rainy winters (180 cm/year)!

Lori S.
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-10-27

It just occurred to me that you might have meant Campanula cervicaria, Trond... ?

Lori
Calgary, Alberta, Canada - Zone 3
-30 C to +30 C (rarely!); elevation ~1130m; annual precipitation ~40 cm

Hoy
Hoy's picture
Title: Member
Joined: 2009-12-15

Lori wrote:

It just occurred to me that you might have meant Campanula cervicaria, Trond... ?

Yes, of course! Thank you Lori :o

Trond
Rogaland, Norway - with cool, often rainy summers  (29C max) and mild, often rainy winters (180 cm/year)!

Boland
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Title: Member
Joined: 2009-09-25

Trond, I grew a Campanula moesiaca that looks like your cervicaria...maybe a synonym name.  Mine was lovely but alas, biennial and did not self-seed.

Edrianthus are short-lived here too.....essentially they are biennial...must be the wet climate we share Trond.  Wish there were more alpines that could tolerate wet winters!

Todd Boland
St. John's, Newfoundland, Canada
Zone 5b
1800 mm precipitation per year

Hoy
Hoy's picture
Title: Member
Joined: 2009-12-15

Todd wrote:

Trond, I grew a Campanula moesiaca that looks like your cervicaria...maybe a synonym name.  Mine was lovely but alas, biennial and did not self-seed.

Edrianthus are short-lived here too.....essentially they are biennial...must be the wet climate we share Trond.  Wish there were more alpines that could tolerate wet winters!

Could not agree more! I have seen "alpines" from high altitudes in the rainforests at the foot of several mountains but they dislike the cold :-\

Trond
Rogaland, Norway - with cool, often rainy summers  (29C max) and mild, often rainy winters (180 cm/year)!

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