Caltha leptosepala

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Weiser
Title: Member
Joined: 2009-12-04
Caltha leptosepala

Caltha leptosepala is quite common on wet sights across western North America. The lumpers and splitters do not agree on the number of subspecies (I guess that's normal :rolleyes:).
I have noticed that I see two forms, when I come across them in the Sierras. One form displays it's narrow sepaled flowers on longer stems 12"-18" (30-45cm) the other form has some what wider sepals displayed at 6"-8"(15-20cm) in height. In all other respects they appear to be equal.

I like the shorter form better.

http://www.efloras.org/florataxon.aspx?flora_id=1&taxon_id=233500300
http://science.halleyhosting.com/nature/cascade/5petal/butter/caltha/lep...
http://www.calflora.org/cgi-bin/species_query.cgi?where-calrecnum=1320
http://www.pnwflowers.com/flower/caltha-leptosepala-ssp-leptosepala-var-...
http://plants.usda.gov/java/profile?symbol=CALEL7

The taller form

The shorter form

Hoy
Hoy's picture
Title: Member
Joined: 2009-12-15

Both forms are beautiful, John! Do they grow in full sun or does one form prefere more shade than the other?

Trond
Rogaland, Norway - with cool, often rainy summers  (29C max) and mild, often rainy winters (180 cm/year)!

Weiser
Title: Member
Joined: 2009-12-04

Both grow in full sun at alltitudes of 4000'-10,000' (1200-3000meters) from the populations I've incountered.

From the High Desert Steppe
of the Great Basin and the Eastern
Escarpment of the Sierra Nevada Range
Located in Reno/Sparks,NV  zone 6-7
http://www.flickr.com/photos/sierrarainshadow/
John P Weiser

Martin Tversted
Title: Guest
Joined: 2011-03-24

I want them, good supplement to our native yellow species.

Martin

Martin Tversted
Central Jutland, Denmark Z6

Hoy
Hoy's picture
Title: Member
Joined: 2009-12-15

Both Caltha palustris alba and C leptosepala are in flower now. I have to plant more of both ;) However, they are quite similar. Hope it is the right stuff!

Trond
Rogaland, Norway - with cool, often rainy summers  (29C max) and mild, often rainy winters (180 cm/year)!

Lori S.
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-10-27

Gorgeous, Trond!  They are quite similar, aren't they?  Caltha palustris (normal yellow-flowered form) gets very large in its native habitat here; that would seem to be one difference between it and Caltha leptosepala.

Lori
Calgary, Alberta, Canada - Zone 3
-30 C to +30 C (rarely!); elevation ~1130m; annual precipitation ~40 cm

Hoy
Hoy's picture
Title: Member
Joined: 2009-12-15

Lori wrote:

Gorgeous, Trond!  They are quite similar, aren't they?  Caltha palustris (normal yellow-flowered form) gets very large in its native habitat here; that would seem to be one difference between it and Caltha leptosepala.

So far the palustris is the bigger one.

Trond
Rogaland, Norway - with cool, often rainy summers  (29C max) and mild, often rainy winters (180 cm/year)!

cohan
cohan's picture
Title: Guest
Joined: 2011-02-03

All really nice! The yellow C palustris is super common (but still beloved!) here but I'd love to get any different form! I guess seeds are short-lived, so not too often offered and probably unlikely to sprout when they are? (of course what I really want is the red(dish) Caltha fron China seen on SRGC ;)

west central alberta, canada; just under 1000m; record temps:min -45C/-49F;max 34C/93F; http://picasaweb.google.ca/cactuscactus  http://urbanehillbillycanada.blogspot.com/

Hoy
Hoy's picture
Title: Member
Joined: 2009-12-15

cohan wrote:

All really nice! The yellow C palustris is super common (but still beloved!) here but I'd love to get any different form! I guess seeds are short-lived, so not too often offered and probably unlikely to sprout when they are? (of course what I really want is the red(dish) Caltha fron China seen on SRGC ;)

Twice I have had the redflowered species. Both times slugs have eaten all of the plants almost before I have planted them out.
I'll look for seeds of the white one but I'm not optimistic as the flowers actually froze one of the very cold nights last week.

Trond
Rogaland, Norway - with cool, often rainy summers  (29C max) and mild, often rainy winters (180 cm/year)!

cohan
cohan's picture
Title: Guest
Joined: 2011-02-03

I think ours probably see frost regularly, since we are not 'frost free' (as much as we ever are) for several weeks or more after they start flowering..
Where did you get your seed for the red one? I think one or more of the Czech lists offered some, but with supposed short viability I wondered if it would be any good...

west central alberta, canada; just under 1000m; record temps:min -45C/-49F;max 34C/93F; http://picasaweb.google.ca/cactuscactus  http://urbanehillbillycanada.blogspot.com/

Hoy
Hoy's picture
Title: Member
Joined: 2009-12-15

cohan wrote:

I think ours probably see frost regularly, since we are not 'frost free' (as much as we ever are) for several weeks or more after they start flowering..
Where did you get your seed for the red one? I think one or more of the Czech lists offered some, but with supposed short viability I wondered if it would be any good...

I have to admit that I was a little astonished when I saw the flowers destroyed by frost. I did believe they could take some degrees of freezing but I don't know what else it should be.

I didn't sow the red ones, I bought both from online nurseries. Once was Chen Yi and the other I can't remember. Magnar Aspaker have a nice one!
http://www.aspaker.no/Caltha-palustris-var-11.jpg
The plants I had however were quite red with no yellow at all.

Trond
Rogaland, Norway - with cool, often rainy summers  (29C max) and mild, often rainy winters (180 cm/year)!

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