Pedicularis

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Peter George
Title: Member
Joined: 2009-09-03
Pedicularis

I got some seed of Pedicularis oederii and haven't a clue what to do with it. Help, please!! Ironically, I did a bunch of research on germination, but found some interesting information about hosts for the plants, but nothing about how to actually germinate the seed.

Jeddeloh
Title: Member
Joined: 2010-05-02

I've always heard it's impossible to grow up if you succeed be sure and post whatever magic incantation you use.

Jan

Jan Jeddeloh, Portland, Oregon, USA, Zone 8.  Rainy winters (40 inches or 1 meter) and pleasant dry summers which don't start until July most years!

Hoy
Hoy's picture
Title: Member
Joined: 2009-12-15

The few times I have tried I've always sowed in situ. I think Pedicularis need a host - often grass but I am not sure. I do not now whether my efforts have been successful but I think so because I have noticed an increasing amount of still nonflowering small plants.

Here are a few pictures of P oederi (gullmyrklegg) a native here. No references to sowing though.
http://www.google.no/search?q=gullmyrklegg&hl=no&client=firefox-a&rls=or...

Trond
Rogaland, Norway - with cool, often rainy summers  (29C max) and mild, often rainy winters (180 cm/year)!

Lori S.
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-10-27

Dr. Deno, in his publications, reported only on P. rainierensis, which he germinated at room temp using GA-3 (72% germination in 1-4 weeks).  The only other comment is that the seeds were dead after 2 years of dry storage.

Lori
Calgary, Alberta, Canada - Zone 3
-30 C to +30 C (rarely!); elevation ~1130m; annual precipitation ~40 cm

Mark McD
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-12-14

Lori wrote:

Dr. Deno, in his publications, reported only on P. rainierensis, which he germinated at room temp using GA-3 (72% germination in 1-4 weeks).  The only other comment is that the seeds were dead after 2 years of dry storage.

Not that I have much to offer here, but I do recall encountering P. rainierensis while hiking up into the higher altitudes of Mt. Rainier, an evocative first-class plant to be sure, much like the dwarf P. oederi.

Mark McDonough
Massachusetts, USA, near the New Hampshire border USDA Zone 5
antennaria at aol.com
 

Tim Ingram
Title: Member
Joined: 2011-04-27

I have no experience of growing these remarkable plants but know that David and Stella Rankin (Kevock Plants) in Edinburgh have had some trials with them. They may have been selling them as small seedlings before they had made any association with host plants? Cliff has put some wonderful images of many of these hemi-parasitic plants on the IRG section of the SRGC site. Castilleja seem easier to grow and Paul Cumbleton at Wisley has written on these in The Plantsman Vol. 7, 2008, p.218-221 - will have to look out to see how well they might do on the new crevice garden.

Dr. Timothy John Ingram
Faversham, Kent, UK
I garden in a relatively hot and dry region (for the UK!), with an annual rainfall of around 25", winter lows of -10°C and summer highs of 30°C.
 

Weiser
Title: Member
Joined: 2009-12-04

You can all try your hand at germinating seed from Pedicularis groenlandica. I sent seed into the exchange this year.

I would surface sow them and keep the pots very damp exposing them to vernalization. In my view, it would make sense to seed a moisture loving grass or sedge in the pot with them, so they can establish a bond as early as possible.

Here are several photos of Pedicularis groenlandica growing on a fen in the Sierra Nevada.

From the High Desert Steppe
of the Great Basin and the Eastern
Escarpment of the Sierra Nevada Range
Located in Reno/Sparks,NV  zone 6-7
http://www.flickr.com/photos/sierrarainshadow/
John P Weiser

Hoy
Hoy's picture
Title: Member
Joined: 2009-12-15

Weiser wrote:

You can all try your hand at germinating seed from Pedicularis groenlandica. I sent seed into the exchange this year.

I would surface sow them and keep the pots very damp exposing them to vernalization. In my view, it would make sense to seed a moisture loving grass or sedge in the pot with them, so they can establish a bond as early as possible.

Here are several photos of Pedicularis groenlandica growing on a fen in the Sierra Nevada.

One more at my list!

Trond
Rogaland, Norway - with cool, often rainy summers  (29C max) and mild, often rainy winters (180 cm/year)!

Lori S.
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-10-27

Well, I had to look up Pedicularis rainierensis - a lovely thing, to be sure!
http://www.pnwflowers.com/flower/pedicularis-rainierensis
http://www.wnps.org/plants/pedicularis_rainierensis.html
http://calphotos.berkeley.edu/cgi/img_query?enlarge=0000+0000+0807+1142

I dunno about the following photo, though; it looks to me like Pedicularis contorta or something a lot like it.  What do you think?
http://nwwildflowers.wordpress.com/2011/10/29/mt-rainier-lousewort-pedic...
(There's a really cute lupin in the foreground of that pic.)

P. oederii is lovely too - the brown tips to the flowers make it especially interesting.  How tall does it get?
Here's another absolutely stunning one... Pedicularis arctica.  I've only seen these in one place (an alpine ridge in Banff) so far, and only a little colony of 2 or 3 plants.  The height was only about 6-8 cm.  

Lori
Calgary, Alberta, Canada - Zone 3
-30 C to +30 C (rarely!); elevation ~1130m; annual precipitation ~40 cm

Mark McD
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-12-14

Lori wrote:

Well, I had to look up Pedicularis rainierensis - a lovely thing, to be sure!
http://www.pnwflowers.com/flower/pedicularis-rainierensis
http://www.wnps.org/plants/pedicularis_rainierensis.html
http://calphotos.berkeley.edu/cgi/img_query?enlarge=0000+0000+0807+1142

I dunno about the following photo, though; it looks to me like Pedicularis contorta or something a lot like it.  What do you think?
http://nwwildflowers.wordpress.com/2011/10/29/mt-rainier-lousewort-pedic...
(There's a really cute lupin in the foreground of that pic.)

Lori, you have a sharp eye, I believe you are correct that the image in the nwwildflowers link is incorrectly identified as P. rainierensis, does indeed look like it is P. contorta.  I checked out one of my favorite floras of the area, the Burke Museum of Natural History, they always have excellent plant photos, and on their Pedicularis summary page 6 species are listed, including both rainierensis and contorta.  It's worth making a comment on the nwwildflowers site, so I did.
http://biology.burke.washington.edu/herbarium/imagecollection.php?Genus=...

...and some good photos of P. rainierensis one this page, scroll to bottom:
http://biology.burke.washington.edu/herbarium/imagecollection.php?ID=4310

The little blue lupine in the nwwildflowers link is Lupinus lepidus, most likely var. lobbii which is very common in the Mt. Rainier area.  On Burrough's Mt. area ( a"spur" off of Mt. Rainier, on the "dry side" of the mountain), it grew by the acre mixed in with golden Erigeron aureus, the blue and gold combination a most memorable site.
http://biology.burke.washington.edu/herbarium/imagecollection.php?ID=1932

Mark McDonough
Massachusetts, USA, near the New Hampshire border USDA Zone 5
antennaria at aol.com
 

Lori S.
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-10-27

McDonough wrote:

The little blue lupine in the nwwildflowers link is Lupinus lepidus, most likely var. lobbii

Ah, I wondered if it might be the same species we were talking about in the other thread!  What a vivid flower colour in the photo.

Lori
Calgary, Alberta, Canada - Zone 3
-30 C to +30 C (rarely!); elevation ~1130m; annual precipitation ~40 cm

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