Potential trough - just an idea

14 posts / 0 new
Last post
Mark McD
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-12-14
Potential trough - just an idea

Not sure why I hadn't thought about this before. While looking to clean up old debris and discarded household paraphernalia behind my garden shed, I'm reminded that I must get rid of an old metal file cabinet. I have tried to dismantle the file cabinet, I even tried my trusty "Mr. Sledgehammer" on it, but it's built like a battleship, so it has sat behind the shed for 4-5 years outside, still as sturdy as ever. Suddenly I had an idea, what if the file cabinet was turned over, open side up, it could become the frame for a large trough!

So next spring, it will become a trough project. Drainage holes will be drilled through the back panel (back panel becomes the bottom), I'll mount narrow wood furring strips on the sides, then wrap heavy gauge wire mesh around the perimeter, and cover with hypertufa mix. The cabinet is large, and when filled, will be very heavy, so I'll have to make the trough "in place" in whatever destination I pick for it.

On the front side (presentable side) of my shed, I have several smaller troughs. Touring the yard on this sunny but cold day, I'm was reminded about troughs, studying the winterizing growth of trough inhabitants. It struck me just how relatively large and robust the single tiny rosette of Arabis koehleri had grown this year, now multiplied and rather plump (center lower edge of trough), with Townsendia rothrockii to the upper left setting its spring buds now, and a nondescript Erigeron on the left that came from NARGS seed as a Townsendia (not!). For comparison, a photo I already posted before, is the little sprig of Arabis blepharophylla Arabis koehleri flowering this past spring, April 2011. Cute, isn't it.

deesen
deesen's picture
Title: Guest
Joined: 2011-01-31

Good idea Mark. Do show us the finished product when it's ready.

David Nicholson
in Devon, UK  Zone 9b

Hoy
Hoy's picture
Title: Member
Joined: 2009-12-15

A special idea, Mark. Not unlike your wheelbarrow trough ;) How does it look like now btw?

Trond
Rogaland, Norway - with cool, often rainy summers  (29C max) and mild, often rainy winters (180 cm/year)!

Mark McD
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-12-14

Hoy wrote:

A special idea, Mark. Not unlike your wheelbarrow trough ;) How does it look like now btw?

Good color on the "semps" in spring, but the whole affair got weedy during summer, I tried to pull some weeds here and there, but many of the weeds are taprooted dandelions that seeded between the semp rosettes... I plan to extricate the perennial weeds in spring.  The area my wheelbarrow planting was also ignored, as was my main Allium garden... this year with this new & crazy job, I had so little time in the garden that parts of the garden became disastrously weedy. 

Mark McDonough
Massachusetts, USA, near the New Hampshire border USDA Zone 5
antennaria at aol.com
 

penstemon
Title: Member
Joined: 2010-06-24

America's answer to the Fish Box. ....

Bob

Bob

extreme western edge of Denver, Colorado; elevation 1705.6 meters, average annual precipitation 30cm; refuses to look at thermometer if it threatens to go below -17C

penstemon
Title: Member
Joined: 2010-06-24

Quote:

So next spring, it will become a trough project.  Drainage holes will be drilled through the back panel (back panel becomes the bottom), I'll mount narrow wood furring strips on the sides, then wrap heavy gauge wire mesh around the perimeter, and cover with hypertufa mix.  The cabinet is large, and when filled, will be very heavy, so I'll have to make the trough "in place" in whatever destination I pick for it.

You could fit it with wheels.
The bottom two thirds could be filled with stryofoam peanuts, which the roots will grow into, thus making it easier to move.
And not cover it with anything, just leave it as is. A phylum cabinet.

Bob

Bob

extreme western edge of Denver, Colorado; elevation 1705.6 meters, average annual precipitation 30cm; refuses to look at thermometer if it threatens to go below -17C

Mark McD
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-12-14

Nold wrote:

The bottom two thirds could be filled with stryofoam peanuts, which the roots will grow into, thus making it easier to move.
And not cover it with anything, just leave it as is. A phylum cabinet.

Bob

;D

Mark McDonough
Massachusetts, USA, near the New Hampshire border USDA Zone 5
antennaria at aol.com
 

RickR
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-09-21

You so funny, Bob!

I never knew... 8)

Rick Rodich    zone 4a.    Annual precipitation ~24 inches
near Minneapolis, Minnesota, USA

IMYoung
Title: Member
Joined: 2010-01-31

Nold wrote:

America's answer to the Fish Box. ....

Bob

Though not quite so portable!!  ;D But the recycling aspect is one we'd applaud! 

Cheers from the home of the fish box trough.....  ;)

Ian  and/or Margaret Young ( -here it is usually Margaret)

Aberdeen , North East Scotland, UK
Zone 8a

www.srgc.net

Mark McD
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-12-14

IMYoung wrote:

Nold wrote:

America's answer to the Fish Box. ....

Bob

Though not quite so portable!!  ;D But the recycling aspect is one we'd applaud! 

Cheers from the home of the fish box trough.....  ;)

Yes, I'm pleased to recycle the filing cabinet, hopefully into something that is both presentable looking as a finished project, and amenable to the plant inhabitants.  I'm thinking of drilling a few holes in the sides too, and sculpting depressions or holes in the outer hypertufa mix to correspond, to grow some small cushions.  As I do on some projects, I sketch up my plans; it is my intent to post the plans here, and nest year, follow along with the project.

Just googled hypertufa, and now with information so accessible and mainstream, here's a wikipedia link on hypertufa :)
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hypertufa

Mark McDonough
Massachusetts, USA, near the New Hampshire border USDA Zone 5
antennaria at aol.com
 

Mark McD
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-12-14

Hmmm, I'm wondering what's the true identity of the plant I showed above as Arabis koehleri, the leaves of my plant don't look anything like the photos in this link, another misnomer.
http://www.calflora.org/cgi-bin/species_query.cgi?where-taxon=Boechera+k...

I take it that most Arabis in FNA are now Boechera.  
http://www.efloras.org/florataxon.aspx?flora_id=1&taxon_id=104152

Update 04-23-2012: This Arabis grew much larger with many flowering stems; I believe it is Arabis blepharophylla... sigh.

Mark McDonough
Massachusetts, USA, near the New Hampshire border USDA Zone 5
antennaria at aol.com
 

Pages

Log in or register to post comments