European Drosera

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WimB
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Joined: 2011-01-31
European Drosera

A few of the indigenous Drosera's I'm growing in my bog:

D. anglica
D. intermedia
D. rotundifolia

Martin Tversted
Title: Guest
Joined: 2011-03-24

These are wonderful plants. I grow many localities of each species and some show a great deal of variation. I also grow outside D filiformis filiformis, various hybrids of hardy species and obviously D linearis.
I even have some living D arcturi out there that survived the - 20C this past winter!

Martin

Martin Tversted
Central Jutland, Denmark Z6

WimB
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Joined: 2011-01-31

Martin wrote:

These are wonderful plants. I grow many localities of each species and some show a great deal of variation. I also grow outside D filiformis filiformis, various hybrids of hardy species and obviously D linearis.
I even have some living D arcturi out there that survived the - 20C this past winter!

Martin

There's a lot of variation within the species indeed. Don't grow a lot of them though. I only have a few varieties.
I wonder if the australian D. arcturi would survive in Belgium too...I'll have to give it a try

Wim Boens
Wingene Belgium zone 8a

Martin Tversted
Title: Guest
Joined: 2011-03-24

I keep arcturi a bit drier in winter than most others. And inside the unheated greenhouse and outside in summer. It does get the low temperatures but not as wet as the others.
And its small! Only a very few carnivorous leafs on each plant and maybe max 2 cm. Easily gone planted out.

Martin

Martin Tversted
Central Jutland, Denmark Z6

WimB
WimB's picture
Title: Guest
Joined: 2011-01-31

Martin wrote:

I keep arcturi a bit drier in winter than most others. And inside the unheated greenhouse and outside in summer. It does get the low temperatures but not as wet as the others.
And its small! Only a very few carnivorous leafs on each plant and maybe max 2 cm. Easily gone planted out.

Martin

Martin,

I'm more worried about the high temperatures in summer (yesterday and today we had temps going up to 35°C for example). Do you think it would survive that?

Wim Boens
Wingene Belgium zone 8a

Martin Tversted
Title: Guest
Joined: 2011-03-24

I have no idea. I live in Denmark. We dont have 35C...
But the outdoor Sarracenia collection could sure need some of those heat.
Martin

Martin Tversted
Central Jutland, Denmark Z6

WimB
WimB's picture
Title: Guest
Joined: 2011-01-31

Martin wrote:

I have no idea. I live in Denmark. We dont have 35C...
But the outdoor Sarracenia collection could sure need some of those heat.
Martin

Yeah, the Sarracenia's love those temps, as do the Drosera's which are indigenous here in Belgium (like rotundifolia for example). I seem to remember from somewhere D. arcturi doesn't like high temperatures but I don't remember from where.

Wim Boens
Wingene Belgium zone 8a

Paul T
Title: Guest
Joined: 2011-01-31

As long as the moisture is kept up to them, high temps don't bother them.  I grow various Drosera outside and we get to 40oC without any problem.  If they dry out, on the other hand?  :o

Cheers.

Paul T.
Canberra, Australia.
Min winter temp -8 or -9°C. Max summer temp 40°C. Thankfully, maybe once or twice a year only.

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