Physoplexis comosa

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Lori S.
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-10-27

Hoy wrote:

Skulski wrote:

Booker wrote:

An additional image or two to illustrate the barren open aspect where they grow and a plant showing immature blooms ... on the expansive limestone cliffs and boulders at Falzerego in the Dolomites.

Hmm, that looks not totally unlike parts of my tufa garden... perhaps there is hope!

I knew you had a great garden!

I just meant the close-up, not the background!!  ;D

Lori
Calgary, Alberta, Canada - Zone 3
-30 C to +30 C (rarely!); elevation ~1130m; annual precipitation ~40 cm

Hoy
Hoy's picture
Title: Member
Joined: 2009-12-15

Skulski wrote:

Hoy wrote:

Skulski wrote:

Booker wrote:

An additional image or two to illustrate the barren open aspect where they grow and a plant showing immature blooms ... on the expansive limestone cliffs and boulders at Falzerego in the Dolomites.

Hmm, that looks not totally unlike parts of my tufa garden... perhaps there is hope!

I knew you had a great garden!

I just meant the close-up, not the background!!  ;D

Oh, don't be modest ;D ;D

Trond
Rogaland, Norway - with cool, often rainy summers  (29C max) and mild, often rainy winters (180 cm/year)!

Gene Mirro
Title: Guest
Joined: 2010-02-25

I planted them out on a raised bed of sandy loam soil, late last summer.  Some I planted under the shelter of rocks, and some went directly into the raised bed.  Most are emerging now.  So far, they do not seem to be very picky.  But you do have to control the slugs and snails.  Photos to come if/when they bloom.

SW Washington state, 600 ft. altitude

Sellars
Sellars's picture
Title: Member
Joined: 2009-12-29

I took a couple of photos today of Physoplexis comosa.  The first one in a pot has elongated flower stems.  The second in a sand bed with lumps of tufa is growing much tighter and is altogether more satisfying.  Fortunately the slugs haven't found it yet. ;D

David Sellars
From the Wet Coast of British Columbia, Canada

Feature your favourite hikes at:
www.mountainflora.ca
MountainFlora videos:
http://www.youtube.com/user/MountainFlora

RickR
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-09-21

I'm sure most of us are very jealous, David - about either form!  And what an interesting effect with the sun dancing on all the stigmas of the flowers in the first pic...  It's like each flower bunch is setting off their own fireworks display!!!  :o

Rick Rodich    zone 4a.    Annual precipitation ~24 inches
near Minneapolis, Minnesota, USA

Sellars
Sellars's picture
Title: Member
Joined: 2009-12-29

Rick:
I like photographing flowers backlit by the sun as it often enhances the flower colour and creates interesting effects particularly as flowers are translucent.  But I have to admit the fireworks were quite a surprise. I didn't notice it when taking the photograph.

David Sellars
From the Wet Coast of British Columbia, Canada

Feature your favourite hikes at:
www.mountainflora.ca
MountainFlora videos:
http://www.youtube.com/user/MountainFlora

Tim Ingram
Title: Member
Joined: 2011-04-27

This is such a great plant - nothing quite like it, even all the weird and wonderful phyteumas. I would love to get this going in tufa - we were lucky enough to visit Robin and Sue White (Blackthorn Nursery) and Peter Erskine a week or two ago before these had started flowering, but both, particularly Peter, had specimens everywhere in tufa and narrow crevices. Once you find the spot to grow a plant...

Dr. Timothy John Ingram
Faversham, Kent, UK
I garden in a relatively hot and dry region (for the UK!), with an annual rainfall of around 25", winter lows of -10°C and summer highs of 30°C.
 

Gene Mirro
Title: Guest
Joined: 2010-02-25

Here is a sturdy little plant growing in the open ground, on a raised bed of sandy loam:

The bee is interested, but I doubt that it can pollinate the flowers.  The style is too far away.

I planted out roughly 20 plants last Fall, and only one has failed to appear this Spring.

SW Washington state, 600 ft. altitude

Lori S.
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-10-27

Wow!  Fantastic, David and Gene!

Lori
Calgary, Alberta, Canada - Zone 3
-30 C to +30 C (rarely!); elevation ~1130m; annual precipitation ~40 cm

Gene Mirro
Title: Guest
Joined: 2010-02-25

Checking in on my garden-grown P. comosa today:  here is about one third of the group:

[attachthumb=1]  

Sorry about the white flowers all over my garden from the black locust trees.

A nice specimen:

[attachthumb=2]

Seasonal transitions are long drawn-out affairs in the Pacific NW.  So the blooming season is very spread out, and gives less spectacular photo opportunities.  Here is a plant with a spent bloom (center), a fresh bloom (left), and a new bud (right):

[attachthumb=3]

They are in a raised bed of sandy loam soil.  No special protection; lots of sunshine; occasional water in Summer; I apply some dolomite lime once per year, plus a little NPK fertilizer.

I've got about 50 new plants in the greenhouse.  If anybody wants them, you are welcome to them.  But you would have to come and get them.  I don't have time to pack and ship.  If you want more than one or two, I'm sure we can work something out.   8)

SW Washington state, 600 ft. altitude

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