Epimedium 2011

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gerrit
gerrit's picture
Title: Guest
Joined: 2011-04-03

Hello fellow forum members,

This is my first contribution on this thread. Let me introduce myself to those who doesn't know me yet. My name is Gerrit and I live in Holland in an agreeable climate. Mild winters and cool summers, enough rainfall. I am especially dedicated to the genus Epimedium. I started 4 years ago and my collection is extending every year.

The E. season has already started here, due to the very warm and sunny spring so far on.

E. fire dragon grows in a trogue, which is placed against the southwall of the house. Under a deciduous tree. The plants are developing quickly in spring.
E. black sea.
E. brachyrrhizum, the first flowers on one stem. The other stems are not developed yet.
E. davidii 'dwarf form', beautiful big yellow flowers in the same trogue.

Gerrit

Hoy
Hoy's picture
Title: Member
Joined: 2009-12-15

Hello Gerrit! Nice to meet you and your Epimediums! (The warm spring weather stops right north of you - here it is wt spring weather :( )

Trond
Rogaland, Norway - with cool, often rainy summers  (29C max) and mild, often rainy winters (180 cm/year)!

RickR
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-09-21

Welcome to the forum, Gerrit!

That's a nice selection of Epimediums.  Now I am wondering if what I have is misnamed.  I bought it as Fire Dragon, but the bracts are barely tinted purple, and the buds open in a decidedly different fashion...

This is it:

Rick Rodich    zone 4a.    Annual precipitation ~24 inches
near Minneapolis, Minnesota, USA

Lori S.
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-10-27

Hi, Gerrit, and welcome to the forum! What beautiful plants! 

Lori
Calgary, Alberta, Canada - Zone 3
-30 C to +30 C (rarely!); elevation ~1130m; annual precipitation ~40 cm

gerrit
gerrit's picture
Title: Guest
Joined: 2011-04-03

Hello Rick

I presume your plant is E. amber queen. A fantastic plant by the way.

Gerrit.

Mark McD
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-12-14

Hello Gerrit, happy to see you here in the Epimedium thread, with an excellent start to the season.  I must pick up 'Fire Dragon', such a wonderful color combination, and now that I'm working again, I won't feel guilty about buying a few plants ;)  Glad you show 'Black Sea' too, it is a good one that seems so seldom grown, again with a unique flower color effect.  I haven't placed any Epimediums in troughs, but the photo of a dwarf E. davidii in a trough suggests these look quite at home in a trough, I might thy that.

I agree with your suggestion that Rick's Epimedium is 'Amber Queen', another one that I hope to get this year. Just 25 F (-4 C) here this morning, the cold nights are retarding plant growth, still waiting for warmer weather to start the main spring flush of growth... mo epimediums are showing any spring growth yet.  Off to work!

Mark McDonough
Massachusetts, USA, near the New Hampshire border USDA Zone 5
antennaria at aol.com
 

Mark McD
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-12-14

I'm so excited, last year while unemployed, I had unlimited time to play in the garden and I spent lots of time hand-pollinating Epimediums, and sowed approximately 45 flats of fresh harvested seed from both my crosses and some OP (open pollinated) seed.  The flats were protected with wire mesh (chipmunks and squirrels love to eat the seed). Checking the flats today on this warm almost summer-like day, many are showing germination. In fact, what I first noticed on a few flats was the layer of decomposed pine bark mulch I top dress with, was curiously raised up, and upon inspection, found that germination is so prolific that it is literally jacking up the mulch layer :D  I watered them well, with the dryish mulch settling back in.  Maybe in another week or two, I'll report back and take some pics.

Mark McDonough
Massachusetts, USA, near the New Hampshire border USDA Zone 5
antennaria at aol.com
 

AmyO
AmyO's picture
Title: Member
Joined: 2009-12-06

McDonough wrote:

I'm so excited, last year while unemployed, I had unlimited time to play in the garden and I spent lots of time hand-pollinating Epimediums, and [glow=red,2,300]sowed approximately 45 flats [/glow]

OMG!! Now that you are gainfully employed where are you going to find the time and space for all those seedlings??!! :o :o :o

Amy Olmsted
Hubbardton, VT, Zone 4

Mark McD
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-12-14

AmyO wrote:

McDonough wrote:

I'm so excited, last year while unemployed, I had unlimited time to play in the garden and I spent lots of time hand-pollinating Epimediums, and [glow=red,2,300]sowed approximately 45 flats [/glow]

OMG!! Now that you are gainfully employed where are you going to find the time and space for all those seedlings??!! :o :o :o

I have enough space, but time will be the challenge.  On this Epimedium hybridization project, I am totally motivated!  Not knowing if I would ever find a job, I scoped out my targeted Epimedium hybridization for 2011, but now must put much of that on the shelf, except from what I might be able to do on weekends.

In sunny parts of the yard, some ornamental tree are finally getting large enough to produce some shade, so I can underplant with Epimedium.  This photo isn't very good, but you'll get the idea, I use this "tree ring" under Cornus kousa 'Milky Way' to underplant with approximately 120-130 epimedium seedlings.  In this view, it was recently planted the summer of 2010 with 1 & 2 year old seedlings.  After 3 years, when plants start growing in together, I dig them all out, mark and replant the ones I like, and I give away others to friends and my town's local garden club plant sale.  Now, with 45 flats, I will probably be digging up a much greater expanse of sod ;D

Mark McDonough
Massachusetts, USA, near the New Hampshire border USDA Zone 5
antennaria at aol.com
 

gerrit
gerrit's picture
Title: Guest
Joined: 2011-04-03

Epimedium setosum.

Very small flowers, in front of a 'huge' Helleborus.

Gerrit.

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