Miscellaneous Woodlanders

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Hoy
Hoy's picture
Title: Member
Joined: 2009-12-15

Well, I can't say things are normal yet. We went to spend our long holiday (it's Norway's national day today) at the mountain cabin and when we left home yesterday not a single birch tree had leafed out. It has never happened before in the 30 years I have lived here. Usually the birches are green 1th May. However, the forecast says 24C the next couple of days so I expect the trees are green when we are back home!
Here at our cabin it is still patches of snow which is normal though but it has rained much and lots of roads and homes are damaged due to flooding. Warm rain + a lot of snow in the higher places make a lot of water!

Trond
Rogaland, Norway - with cool, often rainy summers  (29C max) and mild, often rainy winters (180 cm/year)!

Mark McD
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-12-14

Who knows the forms of Chrysogonum virginianum (there are 3), I assume by the shortness of this one, it is either var. australe or var. brevistolon. If "var australe", Flora of North America says the stolons are 12-60 cm long! Yikes, 60 cm, or 2', I might have to move this to a wild part of the garden. It's only two years in my garden, so far spreading mildly. But I wonder, and watch.

Mark McDonough
Massachusetts, USA, near the New Hampshire border USDA Zone 5
antennaria at aol.com
 

Lori S.
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-10-27

It certainly looks charming but then I'm a sucker for daisy-like flowers (which I suppose will help explain why I planted some sort of Arnica 15 years ago... which I've been weeding out fitfully ever since.  Damned thing never blooms but it sure gets around.)

Lori
Calgary, Alberta, Canada - Zone 3
-30 C to +30 C (rarely!); elevation ~1130m; annual precipitation ~40 cm

Hoy
Hoy's picture
Title: Member
Joined: 2009-12-15

I like that Chrysogonum whatever sort it is! Wouldn't mind it spread in my woodland!

Trond
Rogaland, Norway - with cool, often rainy summers  (29C max) and mild, often rainy winters (180 cm/year)!

copperbeech
Title: Guest
Joined: 2013-03-15

McDonough wrote:

Who knows the forms of Chrysogonum virginianum (there are 3),

What a coincidence as just yesterday I picked up 3 Chrysogonum virginianum ("Allen Bush"). I was looking for a shorter flowering shade plant and Chrysogonum virginianum seemed interesting from its description.

For those of you that have it, for how long does it flower in the spring? Does it ever repeat bloom...maybe late in the cooler wetter fall?

Afloden
Title: Guest
Joined: 2012-01-15

I have always found this plant difficult to keep alive for long though in the wild it is thoroughly perennial. Maybe I just don't give it spartan conditions (same for Erigeron pulchellus).

When I have grown and flowered it the flowering is once in the spring and that is it. It is usually fairly early as well here in the wild just after the Hepatica flower.

Mark McD
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-12-14

Aaron, with three Chrysogonum virginicum subspecies, maybe there's a form that will be more amenable to your garden, or a strong selection like 'Allen Bush'.

Copperbeach, I had not heard of the 'Allen Bush' selection before, so looked it up. It's interesting that all sites report this plant flowers in spring but also reflowers in autumn.  Here's what three different nurseries say about C. virginicum 'Allen Bush':

North Creek Nursery
http://www.northcreeknurseries.com/index.cfm/fuseaction/plants.plantDeta...
Chrysogonum 'Allen Bush' is typical of the species in most ways with a profusion of dark yellow, star-shaped flowers in spring and a few again in the fall.

New Moon Nursery
http://www.newmoonnursery.com/index.cfm/fuseaction/plants.plantDetail/pl...
‘Allen Bush’ is more compact and floriferous than the straight species. A good ground cover with yellow star-shaped flowers. Needs well-drained, moist soil in full to part shade.

Lazy S's Farm Nursery
http://www.lazyssfarm.com/Plants/Perennials/C_files/Ce-Ci.htm
East Coast Native from PA south. Nice ground cover in rich, well-drained soil but tolerates less than ideal conditions.  The cultivar 'Allen Bush' typifies the species but with a profusion of dark yellow, star-shaped blooms in late spring/early summer and some later in the Fall.  Takes sun in cooler zones, more shade in warmer zones.  Light evergreen, triangular shaped leaves.   Great groundcover.

By the way, I ordered Epimediums and a couple other plants from Lazy S'S Farm Nursery this year (along with orders for Epimedium from 3 other mail order nurseries); the plants from Lazy S were top notch, beautful large vigorous plants perfectly packed, highly recommended.  Three out of four nurseries shipped excellent plants, Lazy S gets the highest grade. :)

Updated photo of my Chrysogonum virginicum, more flowers coming. I'm closely watching to see how far away new stolons appear, to gauge its spread, may have to move it out of its current location close to other plants.  By the way, when I was 8 or 9 years old, this was one of the first plants I grew in a wildflower garden, I started early ;D

Mark McDonough
Massachusetts, USA, near the New Hampshire border USDA Zone 5
antennaria at aol.com
 

Hoy
Hoy's picture
Title: Member
Joined: 2009-12-15

Mark, I am a bit hesitant to ask - but does it set seed?

Trond
Rogaland, Norway - with cool, often rainy summers  (29C max) and mild, often rainy winters (180 cm/year)!

Mark McD
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-12-14

Hoy wrote:

Mark, I am a bit hesitant to ask - but does it set seed?

Honestly, I don't know if it sets seed, but I suppose it must, I haven't paid attention to that point in the two years I've had it back in my gardens after decades absence.

Mark McDonough
Massachusetts, USA, near the New Hampshire border USDA Zone 5
antennaria at aol.com
 

Hoy
Hoy's picture
Title: Member
Joined: 2009-12-15

OK, thanks. Being stoloniferous maybe it doesn't bother using energy on seed.

Trond
Rogaland, Norway - with cool, often rainy summers  (29C max) and mild, often rainy winters (180 cm/year)!

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