Miscellaneous Woodlanders

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Lori S.
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Joined: 2009-10-27

The plants Wim showed with the beautiful showy flowers were previously distinguished from Thalictrum, and referred to as a different genus (for obvious reasons!)- Anemonella - but have been since been lumped.   ??? (I'm sure there is some reason but come on!!)  Anemonella/Thalictrum are are hardy here though, and may be worth trying in your area, Cohan?

Lori
Calgary, Alberta, Canada - Zone 3
-30 C to +30 C (rarely!); elevation ~1130m; annual precipitation ~40 cm

cohan
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Joined: 2011-02-03

I actually had that in my mind, Lori, (Anemonella) but didn't look it up to check..
I'm always interested in woodlanders  ;D that's why I was curious about Rick's native form.... I've looked at-- I think-- some Asian/Russian sp on some seed lists.. among thousands of other things  ;D

west central alberta, canada; just under 1000m; record temps:min -45C/-49F;max 34C/93F; http://picasaweb.google.ca/cactuscactus  http://urbanehillbillycanada.blogspot.com/

RickR
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-09-21

cohan wrote:

Rick, on your wild T thalictroides, are the flowers at all large like these cultivars?

It's a hard to tell, but judging from leaf and petal size comparison and the angle of Wim's close up photos, my wild ones in the garden seem pretty close to the same size.  I think Wim could answer better if he looks at the pics below.  In the wild, as you would expect, size is quite variable, but overall a bit smaller.  I have one cultivar, Schoaff's Double, and its flower width is definitely smaller, but it sure packs on the "petals".

1-2. Thalictrum thalictroides - indigenous type in the garden
3. Thalictrum thalictroides 'Schoaff's Double'

Rick Rodich    zone 4a.    Annual precipitation ~24 inches
near Minneapolis, Minnesota, USA

cohan
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Joined: 2011-02-03

RickR wrote:

cohan wrote:

Rick, on your wild T thalictroides, are the flowers at all large like these cultivars?

It's a hard to tell, but judging from leaf and petal size comparison and the angle of Wim's close up photos, my wild ones in the garden seem pretty close to the same size.  I think Wim could answer better if he looks at the pics below.  In the wild, as you would expect, size is quite variable, but overall a bit smaller.  I have one cultivar, Schoaff's Double, and its flower width is definitely smaller, but it sure packs on the "petals".

1-2. Thalictrum thalictroides - indigenous type in the garden
3. Thalictrum thalictroides 'Schoaff's Double'

Thanks for that, Rick--no doubt the cultivars have some bigger flowers--at least the names suggest it  ;D but the wild form looks perfectly charming :) I'll have to watch for seed.. I do like colour variants, but tend to be less fond of doubles or other sorts of cultivars-- though I find it endlessly fascinating to see what can be coaxed out of a plant's genome!

west central alberta, canada; just under 1000m; record temps:min -45C/-49F;max 34C/93F; http://picasaweb.google.ca/cactuscactus  http://urbanehillbillycanada.blogspot.com/

RickR
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-09-21

I have well over a dozen plants, and they seed and volunteer profusely.  Those pics are from 2005.  I'll try to remember you when seed ripens, Cohan.  They bloom for a very long time in the garden, early May through June, and even into July since they don't seem to have such a driving ephemeral instinct like they do in the woods.  Feel free to remind me in early June.  :)

Rick Rodich    zone 4a.    Annual precipitation ~24 inches
near Minneapolis, Minnesota, USA

cohan
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Joined: 2011-02-03

thanks, Rick, that would be great :)

west central alberta, canada; just under 1000m; record temps:min -45C/-49F;max 34C/93F; http://picasaweb.google.ca/cactuscactus  http://urbanehillbillycanada.blogspot.com/

WimB
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Joined: 2011-01-31

cohan wrote:

interesting to see the Thalictrum, our local sp has sprays of tiny flowers, and flowers in summer,,
Rick, on your wild T thalictroides, are the flowers at all large like these cultivars?

Cohan,

I have some wild-collected (from seed) Th. thalictroides too and they all have smaller flowers but I've heard they can be very variable in the wild and I think European sellers want to make a quick buck by giving different name to barely different clones (like 'Big' and 'XXL' for example, both form the same seller).

Wim Boens
Wingene Belgium zone 8a

cohan
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Joined: 2011-02-03

Wim-- nothing new or surprising there :) I heard of someone who collected cacti in South America for a European nursery, many years ago--they were paid by the number of 'species' they found.. you can imagine there were a lot more species found than reason would dictate  ;D
Nowadays there is probably more money in named cultivars.....  :rolleyes:
Oh well, as long as you can see the plant you are buying, and you like it, doesn't matter what they call it...lol

west central alberta, canada; just under 1000m; record temps:min -45C/-49F;max 34C/93F; http://picasaweb.google.ca/cactuscactus  http://urbanehillbillycanada.blogspot.com/

gerrit
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Joined: 2011-04-03

This is Mertensia virginica. A plant native in the USA. In my part of the world  seldom seen in culture. I wonder if you regard this plant as special, or regard it as almost weed. I understand one won't grow a plant in his garden, while it grows in everybody's garden.
Myself I like it very much, because of it's color,a deep, heavenly blue.

cohan
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Title: Guest
Joined: 2011-02-03

A lovely plant, Gerrit, not native here, but we have M paniculata, a very common wild plant here, but one which I love--it can form very nice full stands, and there are a number of them on my property, as well as roadsides and open woods throughout the area.. I doubt it is much grown in gardens, but if it wasn't native to my land, I'd surely plant it ! There are nice alpine species as well, for those with less space!
two shots from 'wild' places on the farm,

 

And a nice clump under a spruce tree (dry place!!) where we store our lawnmower! year before this patch was even more impressive...

west central alberta, canada; just under 1000m; record temps:min -45C/-49F;max 34C/93F; http://picasaweb.google.ca/cactuscactus  http://urbanehillbillycanada.blogspot.com/

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