Miscellaneous Woodlanders

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WimB
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Miscellaneous Woodlanders

One of the first woodlanders to flower here:

Ypsilandra cavaleriei

Mark McD
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-12-14

WimB wrote:

One of the first woodlanders to flower here:
Ypsilandra cavaleriei

Wim, I've been admiring photos of this unusual genus over on SRGC, seems to be a popular genus in Europe, I have never met seen this plant in North American gardeners, although I don't "get out that much". This is a genus I must look into, as I like small (and early blooming) Liliaceae for the woodland; thanks for showing this one.  Did you grow yours from seed, if so, how long to get a plant to flower?  What are the plant's moisture requirements, wondering how it would do in my dry woodland conditions.

Mark McDonough
Massachusetts, USA, near the New Hampshire border USDA Zone 5
antennaria at aol.com
 

Mark McD
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-12-14

The name Ypsilandra is unusual, and sort of fun to say.  Not very familiar with the genus I looked it up in Flora of China, and I learned a lot about it, the related genera Heloniopsis and our own Eastern US Swamp Pink" Helonias bullata.  I share a miscellany of pertinent links.

Ypsilandra is a small genus of 5 species, and only one species each in Heloniopsis and Helonias.  At one point, all species were classified as Helonias.  The Flora of China separates out Ypsilandra and Heloniopsis by the inflorescence type:

Ypsilandra:  Inflorescence racemose or spicate
Heloniopsis: Inflorescence umbellate or umbellate-racemose

Another Ypsilandra species was shown recently on SRGC, Y. thibetica, reminds me of Scilla autumnalis:
http://www.srgc.org.uk/smf/index.php?action=dlattach;topic=6656.0;attach...

From the Flora of China page on Heloniopsis orientalis:
http://www.efloras.org/florataxon.aspx?flora_id=2&taxon_id=114957
...good line drawing:
http://www.efloras.org/object_page.aspx?object_id=60560&flora_id=2
...photo on SRGC
http://www.srgc.org.uk/smf/index.php?action=dlattach;topic=6656.0;attach...

Tanaka (J. Jap. Bot. 73: 102--115. 1998) reduced Heloniopsis and Ypsilandra to synonymy under Helonias. However, a recent molecular phylogenetic study by Fuse and Tamura (Plant Biol. 2: 1--13. 2000) confirmed that Helonias Heloniopsis and Ypsilandra are not mixed with each other, and they each deserve independent generic status.

More discussion on the Helonias, Heloniopsis and Ypsilandra on the Flora of North America site, where the single N.American plant Helonias bullata is covered.
http://www.efloras.org/florataxon.aspx?flora_id=1&taxon_id=114956

Helonias bullata
http://plants.usda.gov/java/profile?symbol=HEBU
Photo taken in Marsha Russell's garden, Littleton, Massachusetts.

...Helonias bullata image on SRGC:
http://www.srgc.org.uk/smf/index.php?action=dlattach;topic=1722.0;attach...

...New Jersey State publication, scroll halfway down for two photos, one showing habitat:
http://www.state.nj.us/pinelands/science/current/kc/

...US Forest Service page on Helonias bullata:
http://www.fs.fed.us/wildflowers/rareplants/profiles/tep/helonias_bullat...

...photos of Helonias bullata taken at the Garden In The Woods, New England Wild Flower Society, Natick Massachusetts:
http://www.flickr.com/photos/arborboy/386153091/in/faves-7623220@N04/

Mark McDonough
Massachusetts, USA, near the New Hampshire border USDA Zone 5
antennaria at aol.com
 

WimB
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Joined: 2011-01-31

I like Ypsilandra and Heloniopsis a lot too. I'm afraid they wouldn't like your dry summers though  :'(. I'm fairly certain Heloniopsis would not survive a year if its roots dry out. I have problems with some of the Heloniopsis, since even though we normally have "Belgian" summers (meaning with a lot of rain and rain and rain...), we sometimes can have very hot and dry summers too. You could try this Ypsilandra since it seems to be a lot stronger, but no guarantees. I didn't sow this plant and it has never set seed for me...I guess the pollinators are absent here (maybe I should start walking around with a paintbrush  ;))

Here's another picture of Ypsilandra cavaleriei from today.

Wim Boens
Wingene Belgium zone 8a

WimB
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I've only ever seen Y. cavaleriei and Y. thibetica either. I didn't even know there were three other species. I'll post some pics of Heloniopsis when they are flowering here. As for Helonias: that is a really stunning plant. I've tried it from seed a few times but was never successful. I guess I'll have to buy a plant.

Wim Boens
Wingene Belgium zone 8a

Mark McD
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-12-14

Oh my, your Ypsilandra is even more beautiful today... so delicate... gorgeous! :o :o :o

I am planning to make a new garden in a singular low spot (still up on a hill) in my garden, when I envision the ability to grow plants needing more moisture.  In spring, I can't mow the grass in this small area until about June because water run-off from the hill passes through and my tractor mower gets stuck in the mud.

Regarding Helonias, this is a true swamp plant, has to be grown with its feet in water, at least that is how I've seen it growing here.  North of me, in Southern New Hampshire, Dr. George Newman has a fantastic woodland garden of 4-5 acres, surrounded by wetlands and swamps.  He puts "waders" on and plants the swampy areas with Helonias, where they grow to majestic proportions, taller than you might imagine... most impressive.  My friend Marsha Russell, grew her plants in large tubs outdoors, the tubs sitting in a 6" deep pool of water in almost full sun; her plants did not grow as tall, but always flowered splendidly.

Mark McDonough
Massachusetts, USA, near the New Hampshire border USDA Zone 5
antennaria at aol.com
 

WimB
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Title: Guest
Joined: 2011-01-31

McDonough wrote:

Oh my, your Ypsilandra is even more beautiful today... so delicate... gorgeous! :o :o :o

I thought so too  ;)

McDonough wrote:

I am planning to make a new garden in a singular low spot (still up on a hill) in my garden, when I envision the ability to grow plants needing more moisture.  In spring, I can't mow the grass in this small area until about June because water run-off from the hill passes through and my tractor mower gets stuck in the mud.

Regarding Helonias, this is a true swamp plant, has to be grown with its feet in water, at least that is how I've seen it growing here.  North of me, in Southern New Hampshire, Dr. George Newman has a fantastic woodland garden of 4-5 acres, surrounded by wetlands and swamps.  He puts "waders" on and plants the swampy areas with Helonias, where they grow to majestic proportions, taller than you might imagine... most impressive.  My friend Marsha Russell, grew her plants in large tubs outdoors, the tubs sitting in a 6" deep pool of water in almost full sun; her plants did not grow as tall, but always flowered splendidly.

With a low spot which stays damp you might be able to grow these plants. I look forward to seeing your project progress.

I've tried sowing Helonias in swamp-like conditions. In the same way I sow Sarracenia, Pinguicula and Drosera. But maybe they need another growing medium than a peat/sand mix?

Wim Boens
Wingene Belgium zone 8a

Hoy
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Title: Member
Joined: 2009-12-15

I have been looking for other species of Ypsilandra to grow here. I have had Y thibethica for years and it grows very well in a rather dry position in my woodland.
Picture taken March last spring:

..and a few days later:

It blooms early but not yet this year. I have never seen seed but I think youhave to grow different clones.
Seems that cavaleriei looks abit better but my plant grows in deep shade.

Trond
Rogaland, Norway - with cool, often rainy summers  (29C max) and mild, often rainy winters (180 cm/year)!

cohan
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Joined: 2011-02-03

Interesting to see these! The Helonias is especially interesting! I wonder how hardy any of these are? None of your areas are cold enough to count...lol

west central alberta, canada; just under 1000m; record temps:min -45C/-49F;max 34C/93F; http://picasaweb.google.ca/cactuscactus  http://urbanehillbillycanada.blogspot.com/

Hoy
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Title: Member
Joined: 2009-12-15

cohan wrote:

Interesting to see these! The Helonias is especially interesting! I wonder how hardy any of these are? None of your areas are cold enough to count...lol

Cohan, my plant has taken severe frost this winter without snow cover - unharmed! (Been down to -16C)

Trond
Rogaland, Norway - with cool, often rainy summers  (29C max) and mild, often rainy winters (180 cm/year)!

cohan
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Joined: 2011-02-03

Good to know--means it might at least survive part of september here ;)
seriously, of course, you never know--many things survive where you don't expect it--just look at Lori's garden  ;D and of course, I don't know how cold it gets where these come from

west central alberta, canada; just under 1000m; record temps:min -45C/-49F;max 34C/93F; http://picasaweb.google.ca/cactuscactus  http://urbanehillbillycanada.blogspot.com/

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